Tag Archives: website

Why advertise on a newspaper’s website?

“I have my own website, why do I need to advertise on your newspaper’s website?”

In this day and technological age, this is still a common inquiry. I’ve been asked by advertising executives to create a fact sheet for potential advertisers that will include the basic reasons why simply having your own website isn’t enough.

Just as in days past proprietors believed they would attract business by placing signage on their storefront, some still believe hosting their own URL is the appropriate amount of advertising. It’s not. Why hope a potential client will find you via a search engine when you can spread the word to our hundreds of thousands of readers instead?

While the logistics of the fact sheet are worked out, I would like to attach the following press release from JK Moving and Storage, the no. 3 moving company in the country, who just launched a multimedia advertising campaign. In their own words:

JK Moving Services, a full-service moving company founded in 1981 and specializing in residential, commercial, and international moving and storage will launch its first integrated advertising campaign on August 13th in the Washington, D.C. region.

Specifically, the campaign will consist of radio, print, online, mobile, and social media elements.

“Even as the third largest independent mover in North America, we are still ‘a best kept secret’ among some key audiences located right in our backyard,” said Charles Kuhn, Founder, President, and CEO, JK Moving Services.

“Our goal is to reach women in this region who typically are the ones selecting the moving company for their families, introduce them to JK Moving, and let them know how we can make this process ‘worry-free.’”

A campaign was developed consisting of four :30 second radio spots and unique banner ads, a mobile-specific ad, a social media campaign, and a print execution.

As part of the program, customers will be directed to JK Moving’s web site to request a free estimate and be entered for a chance to win a free move.

The campaign’s theme is centered on JK Moving Services’ ability to reduce the stress of moving for the homeowner, offering a “worry-free” move. It’s designed to speak to female heads of household who tend to be the decision-maker in selecting a moving company.

They are the ones most involved in the logistics of moving — ensuring a smooth transition.

Each 30 second spot will demonstrate what makes JK Moving different and how the company can alleviate the stress of moving.

The radio ads will be coupled with an online and print campaign that will target the Metro D.C. market.

If an $85 million company feels the need to advertise across that many channels, chances are you may, too.

The No. 1 rule for your company’s domain name

I broke some rules when I chose my company’s name. First of all, I knowingly used a name that already existed. On top of that, I’m using my initials. I don’t care for two reasons; hrh media is named after its founder, Hannah Rebekah Hager, and that founder also happens to have the initials of Her Royal Highness. I’ve been playing that card my entire life and I wasn’t about to stop it because some other business also has my initials.

Don’t follow my suit. When it comes to your customer, and the likelihood of them finding you in the virtual world, you need to remove as many roadblocks as possible on their route to your website.

Your business name = Your domain name

When you meet someone you’d like to do business with, the first thing either one of you do when you return to your computer is Google one another. You might not have had a business card at the time, they might not remember your name, but hopefully they will remember your company’s name, “I Write Good.” Chances are they’ll look you up on a search engine or type the URL directly into their browser. When http://www.IWriteGood.com doesn’t automatically show up — or worse, your competitor’s website does instead — its over for you. Your business name should equal your domain name. One more thing; be a .com. No one really trusts a .biz or a .net.