Tag Archives: editing

Effective Email Marketing for Niche Markets

This is a rough recreation of a niche marketing email I wrote for the Military Radar community. A few notes about why it works:

  • It has a catch subject line
  • It opens with a quote from an industry expert
  • It presents the event’s Five W’s upfront
  • It has four calls-to-action to download the content piece
  • It establishes industry knowledge

Let’s get to the email. The subject line was:

From the Desk of Dr. Guerci: Next Gen Antennas

8th Annual Military Radar Summit
February 23-25, 2015
Washington, D.C.

www.MilitaryRadarSummit.com

The Military Radar Summit is a truly unique venueIt addresses the entire radar enterprise: emerging customer needs and markets, the latest technology developments and unparalleled networking opportunities with those ready to do business…

Dr. Joe Guerci, Fellow and Warren D. White Award Recipient, IEEE

Dr. Guerci, the foremost radar authority, has been the Military Radar Summit’s chairman many times over and has provided us with an exclusive article on the Next Generation of Affordable Smart Antennas. Read the full article here.

Dr. Guerci's content piece, which is promoted in this content marketing email.
Dr. Guerci’s content piece, which is promoted in this content marketing email.

Next Generation Affordable Smart Antennas

A confluence of advances in low cost digitally controllable RF metamaterial-based apertures and real-time embedded cognitive signal processing has afforded a new opportunity to realize a distinctly new and affordable low SWAP smart antenna capability for a multitude of demanding applications from communications to radar. This article, which is co-authored by Dr. Joe Guerci in the Microwave Journal, provides an overview of these enabling advances, their synergistic combination and the new markets that are emerging as a result.

Download the ArticleEmail Me the Article

For more information on the event, including the draft agenda, additional content and speaker and session information, visit www.MilitaryRadarSummit.com.

I look forward to seeing you this February 23-25 in Washington, D.C.

Kind regards,

Headshot-1

Hannah Hager
Online Content Director
IDGA

P.S. Take a peek at this summary of our past attendees for an idea of who you can expect to meet and network with at the event.

Here’s the full thumbnail of the email:

Guerci Thumbnail

Ampersands — Use sparingly

Did you know this symbol has a name?

An ampersand is the informal symbol for "and."
An ampersand is the informal symbol for “and.”
It’s called an ampersand and it’s grossly over-used in business writing. Ampersands are pronounced as written: am-per-sand.

The ampersand is an over-used abbreviation for the word “and” – it really should be limited to a few situations in formal, business writing:

1.) In company names where it’s warranted (Smith & Jones Law Firm)

2.) When artistic considerations dictate; e.g., a logo

3.) In specific academic references (Grant & Smith Publishing,2001)

4.) Addressing a couple on an invitation or envelope (Mr. & Mrs. Smith)

5.) When items in a series are related, but this is bridging on unacceptable (John has experience in Marketing, Research & Design and Business Management)

In general, it is not proper grammar to simply abbreviate the word and replace it with an ampersand. Why? Because the ampersand symbol is considered more casual. If you’re working for a business-to-business or business-to-consumer company, you should not be using it. If you want to send it in a text message to your bae, however, that’s fine by me.

In conclusion, it’s not that I hate the ampersand, it’s just not correct in formal, business writing.

Everybody has a Story to Tell

The awkward silence. Far from foe, the awkward silence is your best friend.

Let me ask you something: What is your first reaction when you’re on the phone with someone and the natural flow of the conversation ends? If you’re like most people, it is to immediately fill the space with your words. Say something. Anything.

As a newspaper reporter and journalist, one of the best pieces of advice I ever received was to let the other person fill the awkward silence space. In journalism, this is a nifty technique that prompts the source to tell you information they might not have previously shared. In life, it’s a great technique for teaching you patience in conversation.

Most of us start out as selfish conversationalists. Raise your hand if you’ve ever experienced the following daftness: The man who drones on and on about his life and travels. The woman who cuts you off to share her opinion, story or antecdote, which she believes is far more relevant than what you have to say. We all hate these people. I was once these people — and it failed me miserably. Not only did I send people running for the hills with my self absorption, I was also failing to learn anything about anyone else.

If you don’t find someone interesting then your problem is you’re doing all the talking.

“What really knocks me out is a book that, when you're all done reading it, you wish the author that wrote it was a terrific friend of yours and you could call him up on the phone whenever you felt like it.” - J.D. Salinger, author of The Catcher in the Rye
“What really knocks me out is a book that, when you’re all done reading it, you wish the author that wrote it was a terrific friend of yours and you could call him up on the phone whenever you felt like it.”
– J.D. Salinger, author of The Catcher in the Rye

Since I made the long and painful process from becoming a “talker” to a “listener,” I have never met a boring person. Hear me out. People love to talk about themselves. This is a simple fact. If you start asking them questions about their life, work, family or hobbies you will find that they always come up with something interesting to say. What this means is that you also have something interesting to say.

A top excuse among aspiring writers is that they “don’t have anything to say.” We all have a story to tell. Simply write what we know. I’ve learned to ignore the snickering when I say that I write about my life. Oh, you don’t think my life as a twenty-something, middle-class white girl living in NYC isn’t interesting enough? You’re wrong. Someone, somewhere will be able to relate to me. And that’s the point of writing, isn’t it?

I don’t care if you’re a reformed drug dealer who was detained in Peru for six years on smuggling charges or if you’re a housewife in Oklahoma who has never left the United States. You and your story have value.

“What really knocks me out is a book that, when you’re all done reading it, you wish the author that wrote it was a terrific friend of yours and you could call him up on the phone whenever you felt like it.” – J.D. Salinger, author of The Catcher in the Rye.

When you write, write for yourself and write like you’re talking to a friend. I think you’ll find that by using this foundation

your readers will eventually become your friends.

20 Common English Grammar Mistakes

I’m currently in learning mode. I’ve been working hard to sharpen my language skills and writing skills in order to stay on top of my game. In order order to do so, I’ve been scouring the web for insight and came across this post via Joanna Goodard’s blog. It goes into the top 20 common English grammar mistakes.

My favorites are the use of “who” and “whom” and “fewer or less”

Fewer and Less

“Less” is reserved for hypothetical quantities. “Few” and “fewer” are for things you can quantify. e.g., The firm has fewer than ten employees. e.g., The firm is less successful now that we have only ten employees.

Who and Whom

This one opens a big can of worms. “Who” is a subjective — or nominative — pronoun, along with “he,” “she,” “it,” “we,” and “they.” It’s used when the pronoun acts as the subject of a clause. “Whom” is an objective pronoun, along with “him,” “her,” “it”, “us,” and “them.” It’s used when the pronoun acts as the object of a clause. Using “who” or “whom” depends on whether you’re referring to the subject or object of a sentence. When in doubt, substitute “who” with the subjective pronouns “he” or “she,” e.g., Who loves you? cf., He loves me. Similarly, you can also substitute “whom” with the objective pronouns “him” or “her.” e.g., I consulted an attorney whom I met in New York. cf., I consulted him.

But, don’t you feel that if you used “whom” in a conversation you would come off a bit snobby?